Lyricality’s Online Journal

Khadijo (JoJo) Abdi’s ‘The Gardener’

Meet Minneapolis Creative Khadijo Abdi 

Others receive positive feedback that makes them feel good about themselves and confident in their abilities, while someone with impostor syndrome takes praise from others as an exaggeration rather than a true reflection of their abilities. People with impostor syndrome are unable to internalize success. Imposter by Khadijo (JoJo) Abdi addresses this issue that many women with multiple and diverse identities face.

Paramount Center for the Arts Commissions Lyricality to Create LISTENING BACK TO IMAGINE WHO WE COULD BECOME, a Collaborative Communal Poem to Honor the Theatre’s 100th Anniversary

Paramount Center for the Arts Commissions Lyricality to Create LISTENING BACK TO IMAGINE WHO WE COULD BECOME, a Collaborative Communal Poem to Honor the Theatre’s 100th Anniversary

On August 26 at the Paramount Center for the Arts Theatre, audience members heard the debut of a new poem. Tracy Rittmueller read this collaborative communal work sponsored in part by Bill and Linda Henrichs and Gate City Bank. This article discusses the history of collaborative communal poetry, the general and specific artistic process that made this commemorative poem, names the collaborators, and shares a dream for preserving this history-making commission.

Anisa Hagi-Mohamed, Halima Hagi-Mohamed and Louise K. Waakaa’igan in Conversation

Anisa Hagi-Mohamed, Halima Hagi-Mohamed and Louise K. Waakaa’igan in Conversation

In this conversation, Lyricality’s “Read Poetry 2020” poet Anisa Hagi-Mohamed reads her poem Maxaa Kaa Maqan? What is missing from your life? in response to the poem I’m Okay by Louise K. Waakaa’igan. Afterwards, Anisa’s sister, poet Halima Hagi-Mohamed reads her poem Nomad in response to the poem This is Where by Louise K. Waakaa’igan.

How to read Now We Will Speak In Flowers by Micki Blenkush as a way to cultivate empathy, with a mini review of the book

How to read Now We Will Speak In Flowers by Micki Blenkush as a way to cultivate empathy, with a mini review of the book

Now We Will Speak in Flowers by Micki Blenkush does not candy-coat or sentimentalize the nature of human experience. Instead, she boldly explores human vulnerability and themes of connection/disconnection, and how extreme disconnection may lead to extremely altered states of perception. And it is exactly this sense of actuality that fosters the art of empathy.

Meet Central Minnesota Poet Hedy Tripp

Meet Central Minnesota Poet Hedy Tripp

Hedy Tripp was born and educated in Singapore. A Saint Cloud elder with the Minnesota Coalition of Asian American Leaders (CAAL) and retired professor/lecturer, she came to her identity as a poet late in life, she says, “Because I never had time, earlier, to say, ‘I am a poet.’”

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