Lyricality’s Online Journal

I Don’t Know You but I Know You by Angerise Carter

I Don’t Know You but I Know You by Angerise Carter

Strangers are walking fiction. Our brains, on the other hand, force us to actively imagine who we see walking towards us, even if what our thoughts make up are dangerously untrue. We care about appearance; we are quietly vain, but we are also private investigators, trying to figure out what each stranger passing us by could hint at. Remember, every stranger is someone and more importantly every stranger is someone’s partner, caregiver, offspring or sibling.

I Don’t Know You but I Know You by Angerise Carter

A Cricket Climbs Up by Matthew Koob Pheej Yang

Crickets have been known to be a symbol of prosperity. This five lined poem gives the reader all the hopes and feels of good luck and happiness. I don’t know about you, but when I read it I could feel the warm wind on the back of my neck. Follow the link, take a read and let this cricket connect you to being a believer in your instincts and spiritual guidance.

I Don’t Know You but I Know You by Angerise Carter

I Don’t Know It Yet, But This Is Living by Zakiah Goff

On days when life seems pointless and you’re just going through the motions, there’s always that empty pit someplace inside your spirit that never seems to fill. Zakiah Goff addresses this gut wrenching feeling in “I Don’t Know It Yet, But This Is Living”. We all have felt this at some point, or many points, in life: is life ever going to get better?

I Don’t Know You but I Know You by Angerise Carter

Poppies by Sarah Degner Riveros

The petals of a poppy flower are pompous, they may be of nearly any color. But after reading
Sarah Degner Riveros poem Poppies, we all know that these poppies are red beneath hazy yellow skies. A poem you can visually see for your first Sunday in May, and May Day at that!

I Don’t Know You but I Know You by Angerise Carter

On the Trail by Janna Knittel

The only place that feels vast enough to hold sadness this deep and wide is in nature, looking out into forever. Just as grief is a constant in our lives, so are the trees and trails we can get lost in. Walk about the trail with Janna Knittel in her poem On the Trail.

I Don’t Know You but I Know You by Angerise Carter

Rising by Debra Darby

When we make daily attempts to modify and improve what we can control, hope may build determination and grit—the ability to bounce back and remain resolute despite setbacks and death. Rising, a poem by Debra Darby, emphasizes the significance of optimism and endurance.

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