Lyricality’s Online Journal

Sky Trees Phoem by Jerry Wellik

Sky Trees Phoem by Jerry Wellik

“When I first encountered Jerry Wellik’s “Sky Trees Phoem” I questioned whether it that “h” was a typographical error…. Reading poetry helps me practice the skills of curiosity and wonder, and that increases my awareness, gratitude, and delight.

Sky Trees Phoem by Jerry Wellik

Amending an Inheritance by Beth Spencer

Amending an Inheritance by Beth Spencer is like a prayer of confession and repentance, embodying a desire for people to overcome past and repeated failings, to be and do better. You may notice the second stanza of this poem has fewer lines than the first, perhaps alluding to the universal belief that human transformation involves pruning. Also pay attention to the way she uses traditionally “religious” language to challenge patriarchal and intergenerational violence. The title tells us this poem does not disown its inheritance. Instead it redeems, insisting the heir deserved and will pass on something better.

Sky Trees Phoem by Jerry Wellik

Cocoon by Hedy Tripp

Cocoon by Hedy Tripp is a poem of lament, similar to a prayer in its expression of sorrow, springs from a hope for a future healing when today’s loss turns into “love and peace.” If you wonder what makes a poem different from an individual’s memory of an event, notice this poet’s use of repetition and the poem’s emotional sequence from love to loss to restoration. Combined, these devices allow a reader to experience the consoling back and forth momentum of a rocking cradle.
The time you invest in reading a poem is important to a poet, but more than that, it is important to our communities. To listen to a poem with the ear of your heart creates space for radical empathy to dwell among us. Thank you for paying attention to Minnesota poets and their poems.

Sky Trees Phoem by Jerry Wellik

Prayer Flags by Wendy Brown-Baéz

To compose a poem is an act of faith as bold as prayer. “Prayer Flags” illustrates that a poet will often “wonder if anyone hears my heart speaking…”

The time you invest in reading a poem is important to a poet, but more than that, it is important to our communities. To listen to a poem with the ear of your heart creates space for radical empathy to dwell among us. Thank you for paying attention to Minnesota poets and their poems.

Sky Trees Phoem by Jerry Wellik

Crevice by Emerson Sloane

Guest editor Lane Henson writes, “I love Emerson Sloane’s poem, CREVICE, for its intense passion and imagery. The poet does not waste any words here – the power comes from the concise language, tight rhythm, and evocative sounds. Emerson’s razor-sharp focus carries us skillfully into this world she has created, that she is stirring awake, in three short stanzas.”

Sky Trees Phoem by Jerry Wellik

You did it, Frank by Bob Monahan

Bob Monahan’s You did it, Frank is a poem filled with sharp metaphors spoken softly. The contemplative nature of this piece invites the reader into the poet’s process as they struggle with the “quivering quill” of fierce inspiration and the sometimes inevitable one-that-gets-away.

Sky Trees Phoem by Jerry Wellik

Tula by Chris Santiago

May is Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Month. Our guest editor is Su Hwang, author of Lyricality's Read Poetry 2020 selection Bodega. Chris Santiago is the author of Tula, selected by A. Van Jordan as the winner of the 2016 Lindquist & Vennum Prize for Poetry. A 2017 Finalist for the Minnesota Book Award and 2018 McKnight...

Sky Trees Phoem by Jerry Wellik

Authenticity by Jennifer Kwon Dobbs

Jennifer Kwon Dobbs is the author of two poetry collections and two chapbooks, most recently Interrogation Room (White Pine Press, 2018) mentioned in The New York Times and the recipient of the 2020 Association of Asian American Studies Book Award for Outstanding Achievement in Creative Writing: Poetry. Su Hwang selects “Authenticity” by Jennifer Kwon Dobbs.

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